How I Came To Be Making Crab Cakes Today

It started innocently enough. I was doing a bit of research for my brother Roy, who has a new music project in the works. I was looking for contacts in the Nova Scotia Mi’qmaq community who have some legends to tell about Cape Split.

My search took me to a woman who works at Kejimkujik National Park, where she is a story teller and guide. So I spent the next 20 minutes reading about ancient petroglyphs in the park, like this one (photo credit http://www.muiniskw.org):

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From there I went searching at the Nova Scotia Natural History Museum, and eventually found myself learning about Charles MacDonald. He started a concrete factory in my home town close to 100 years ago. He apparently didn’t pay his employees, but instead had a company money pot. Staff took what they needed whenever they needed it. MacDonald also hired workers to build five cottages for him (this was during the 1930s when employment was scarce and so this was a bit of a ‘make work’ project). All the cottages were constructed of concrete of course. Four of them are still standing. They are known as the ‘Fairy Houses’ and are located at Huntington Point near Hall’s Harbour. (Photo credit for next three pictures http://www.valleyfamilyfun.ca)

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If you become a member of the Charles MacDonald Museum Society you can stay in the blue cottage for a donation of a few hundred dollars a week.

Then I fell down another rabbit hole…hikes in the Annapolis Valley. This led me to this beautiful waterfall, which is just a stone’s throw from where I grew up. Funny that I didn’t know of its existence before now.

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By this time it was getting close to lunch, and I was good and homesick. There was only thing one thing to do…make crab cakes. So while I didn’t get far with my brother’s project, I did learn a pocketful of other facts, and I had a tasty lunch to boot.

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